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Posts Tagged ‘Denmark Tax’

Nicole-DeRosaThis week’s blog post is written by Withum’s International Services Group member, Nicole DeRosa.

Who says taxes are logical? Even Albert Einstein agrees that “the hardest thing in the world to understand is the income tax.” While maybe not the easiest to understand, most taxes and tax exemptions are usually logical… except the few legitimate ones we found below.

china_round_icon_256China – Chopsticks Tax

In 2006, China introduced a 5% tax on disposable wooden chopsticks in an effort to preserve its vanishing forests. Annual production of disposable wooden chopsticks in China exceeds 45 billion pairs, which is equivalent to about 25 million trees – that is a lot of wood!

denmark_round_icon_256Denmark – Fart Tax

Yes, you read that correctly – the fart tax. In 2009, proposals to tax the flatulence of cows and other livestock was quite the hot topic in Denmark. Livestock contribute 18% of the greenhouse gases believed to cause global warming, according to the U.N. Food and Agriculture Organization.

united_states_of_america_round_icon_256United States – Tanning Tax

Much to the dismay of Jersey Shore’s Snooki, the Tanning Tax was passed in 2010 to help pay for healthcare reform and was meant to deter customers from using indoor tanning salons. The 10% tax was justified by evidence that tanning can lead to skin cancer.

mexico_round_icon_256_1Mexico – Obesity Tax

Aiming to curb unhealthy consumption habits, in 2013 Mexican lawmakers approved an 8% sales tax on high-calorie foods such as potato chips, sweets, and cereal. The controversial tax reform also targeted sugary drinks, increasing the price of sodas by one peso, approximately seven cents. Mexico isn’t the only country that has implemented such a tax. Denmark introduced a fat tax at one point on items that contained more than 2.3% saturated fat. California has implemented the first of this tax in the United States, effective January 1, 2015 called the Measure D Soda Tax which imposes a tax of one cent per ounce on the distributors of specified sugar-sweetened beverages. That’s not too sweet if you think about it!

irelandIreland – Artist Tax Exemption

Starving artists might never go hungry if they reside in Ireland! According the Taxes Consolidation Act of 1997, income earned by writers, composers, visual artists, and sculptors from the sale of their works is exempt from tax in certain circumstances.

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